Category Archive: News

Signs and Symptoms of Stomach Flu

Posted by on December 13, 2018

Could your tummy trouble be viral gastroenteritis, AKA the “stomach flu”?

Viral gastroenteritis, commonly known as the “stomach flu”, is an intestinal infection with some seriously miserable symptoms–think nausea, stomach cramps, and frequent beelines to the bathroom. A number of viruses can cause the unpleasant illness, though norovirus is usually to blame. Rotavirus, adenovirus, astrovirus, and sapovirus are also common.

These viruses are highly contagious, spread quickly from person to person, and are most active from October to April. You can catch a stomach bug simply from being near, shaking hands, or sharing personal items with someone who is sick. You can also develop the illness by consuming contaminated food or water (i.e. food poisoning). Anyone can get viral gastroenteritis, though young children, older adults, dormitory residents, and those with weakened immune systems are more vulnerable.

It’s important to note that the so-called “stomach flu” is not the same as influenza. Real flu is a respiratory infection, whereas gastroenteritis attacks the intestines.

Viral Gastroenteritis symptoms include:

  • Watery, nonbloody diarrhea*
  • Abdominal cramps and pain
  • Nausea, vomiting or both
  • Occasional muscle aches or headache
  • Low-grade fever

*When you have an intestinal infection, your large intestine struggles to retain fluids, which leads to loose, watery stool, generally without smell or blood. Bloody diarrhea may indicate a more severe infection. Head straight to the ER if you notice this symptom.

Symptoms of viral gastroenteritis come on abruptly, and fortunately, don’t last long. The illness usually runs its course within 1-2 days. And since antibiotics are ineffective against viruses, the best treatment plan is plenty of rest and extra fluids. Dehydration as a result of diarrhea and vomiting can be a serious concern, so head into our urgent care center if:

  • You’re unable to keep liquids down for 24 hours
  • You experience vomiting that lasts more than two days
  • You’re dehydrated — signs of dehydration include excessive thirst, dry mouth, deep yellow urine or little or no urine, and severe weakness, dizziness or lightheadedness
  • You’re vomiting blood
  • You have a fever above 104 F (40 C)

Our medical team is available 7 days a week to provide quick, quality treatment when you need it most!

Does my child have an ear infection?

Posted by on November 8, 2018

Your toddler is tugging at their ear and acting extra fussy. Could it be an ear infection?

Ear infections are one of the most common reasons parents bring their child to the doctor. In fact, five out of six kids will experience at least one ear infection by their third birthday. The condition, also known as acute otitis media, is an inflammation of the middle ear that occurs when fluid builds up behind the eardrum and becomes infected by bacteria or a virus. Since your child may not yet have the language skills to communicate their pain, it’s important to learn the signs and symptoms of an ear infection, and when it’s time to see a medical provider.

Signs and Symptoms

child in bed with ear infection Tugging or pulling at the ear(s)

  • Ear pain that’s worse when lying down
  • Irritable, fussier than usual
  • Crying more than usual
  • Difficulty hearing and/or failing to respond to sounds
  • Difficulty balancing
  • Drainage from the ear
  • Fever (100 F or higher)
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Loss of appetite

These symptoms can indicate a number of conditions, so it’s important to get an accurate diagnosis and proper treatment from a medical provider.

When To See A Doctor

Call your child’s doctor, or head right into our clinic if:

  • symptoms last for more than a day
  • ear pain is severe
  • your child is sleepless or irritable after a cold or upper respiratory infection
  • you observe a discharge of fluid, pus or blood from the ear

To diagnose ear pain, our provider will review your child’s symptoms, perform a physical exam, and use a lighted instrument, called an otoscope, to view the eardrum. The provider may also use a pneumatic otoscope to check for fluid behind the eardrum.

If symptoms indicate a bacterial infection, we may be prescribe a course of antibiotics. Other times, it’s best to simply monitor the situation and focus on symptom management. Some earaches are not caused by infection, and will get better on their own within 1-2 days. Ear drops and over-the-counter pain relievers such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen can reduce fever and ease pain.

If your child is suffering from signs and symptoms of an ear infection, we are here for you. Simply walk in for quick, convenient, quality care for you child.

Employee Flu Shot Clinics Now Available!

Posted by on September 16, 2018

Preventing the spread of flu around your office is easy with Physicians Urgent Care employee flu shot clinics!

  1. Pick a day and a PUC location that works for your team
  2. Contact us at jodis@pucclinic.com to schedule
  3. Show up, get a shot & leave with protection from this year’s flu virus

When you schedule a flu shot clinic at PUC, you are providing your employees the easiest and quickest way to get vaccinated – all they have to do is show up!

Available at:

Brentwood
700 Old Hickory Blvd, #207
Brentwood, TN 37027

Berry Farms
5021 Hughes Crossing Suite 165
Franklin, TN 37064

Franklin
155 Covey Drive, #100
Franklin, Tennessee 37067

Flu Season 2018: What You Need to Know

Posted by on January 11, 2018

This year’s flu season is gearing up to be one of the worst, according to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and the Tennessee Department of Health.  All of our Middle Tennessee Physicians Urgent Care clinics have seen many positive flu tests in the last few weeks, and we wanted to share some helpful information with you about how this year’s flu season is unique.

Here are 4 things you should know about the 2018 Flu Season:

1. A bad flu season for Australia means we will likely have a bad flu season. 

We have already seen that flu is bad from the number of sick patients coming to our clinics, however officials tell us it may continue to get worse.  Health officials use information from Australia’s flu season, which runs from May to October, to predict trends for the American flu season, which runs from October until May.  Australia had a record high number of confirmed flu cases for their season, and the H3N2 influenza A subtype that was most prevalent was especially nasty with more severe symptoms.   Flu season in the US peaks from December to February, so we are just now hitting the worst of the season.

2. People die every year from the flu, and this year is no different. 

Tennessee has already experienced four flu-related deaths this flu season, including children and a pregnant woman.  Children under 5 and the elderly are most at risk of death from the flu, however it is recommended that everyone who is able get a flu shot.  Remember it takes about two weeks for your body to build up immunity to the virus after vaccination, so if you haven’t gotten a flu shot, get one today!

3.    This year’s flu shot is likely to be less effective than usual, but you should still get one.

We won’t know how effective the shot is until the flu season is over, but Australia’s shot was found to be less effective than usual.  Even though the vaccine is not a guaranteed protection from all flu-like illnesses, it does offer some protection.  Studies have also found that the flu shot will lessen the course and severity of the disease should you get it and could reduce the risk of death in children who get the flu. 

4.    Basic health and hand hygiene really make a difference in preventing the spread of the flu.

Simple things like staying away from sick people, avoiding touching your face, washing your hands, and cleaning commonly touched surfaces like phones, grocery carts and door handles really help to reduce the spread of germs. If you are sick with flu, stay home from work or school to prevent spreading flu to others.  You can purchase masks from any local pharmacy if someone in your home has the flu.

The most common symptoms of this year’s flu are moderate-to-high fever (although not everyone with the flu will run a fever), sore throat, shaking chills, severe muscle or body aches, headache, stuffy and runny nose and profound fatigue. 

If you experience these symptoms head to one of our four Middle Tennessee Physicians Urgent Care locations to get appropriately diagnosed and treated.  Locally owned and operated by ER physicians – we pride ourselves on excellent care, given efficiently!  

West Nashville –  On Charlotte Pike, in front of the Nashville West Shopping Center

Brentwood –  Off Old Hickory Blvd, near Firebirds and the Well Coffee Shop

Berry Farms – Located off the Goose Creek Bypass in the Berry Farms Town Center, just down from Publix.

Franklin – On the corner of Route 96 & Carothers Parkway in front of Williamson County Medical Center.

 

For more flu information, check out the following links:

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season-2017-2018.htm

https://www.acsh.org/news/2018/01/02/some-bad-flu-news-h3n2-major-player-year-12350

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1714916?query=featured_home&

 

Physicians Urgent Care opens new clinic in Berry Farms

Posted by on August 30, 2017

Physicians Urgent Care Berry Farms

Franklin, Tenn. — Physicians Urgent Care, a group of walk-in clinics with care directed by emergency room physicians, has opened a new location in the Berry Farms Town Center, 5021 Hughes Crossing, Suite 165 in Franklin.

Physicians Urgent Care brings a unique combination of quality, efficiency, comfort and accessibility to patients with non-life-threatening emergencies. Locally owned by Board-Certified ER physicians, the clinics can treat a majority of cases normally seen in a hospital emergency room, without the high cost or long wait times.

“Berry Farms is a new, up-and-coming community with lots of families, the perfect match for our clinics,” said Dr. Ty Babcock from Physicians Urgent Care. “Patients will love our convenient hours and our unique pediatric rooms designed especially for kids.”

The clinic is open 8am-6pm weekdays, Saturdays and Sundays.

Physicians Urgent Care clinics look more like living rooms than doctor’s offices, with free snacks and soft drinks. Colorful pediatrics rooms feature toys, games, televisions and low seating to make children feel more at home.

“Care in our clinics is either directly provided by or coordinated through specially trained ER physicians, who bring an added level of expertise to our patients,” said Dr. Babcock. “At the same time, the average length of a visit is about 40 minutes, and our costs are a fraction of what you’d see in a hospital ER.”

Physicians Urgent Care clinics can treat a variety of illnesses from colds, allergies and infections to bronchitis and pneumonia. They can also handle minor trauma; burns and cuts; insect bites; fractures, sprains and dislocations; and work-related injuries. Physical exams, including sports physicals, are also offered.

On-site X-ray capabilities, labs and procedure rooms allow Physicians Urgent Care to treat many conditions that most doctors’ offices and other clinics cannot.

“Our goal is to make it as easy as possible to get the care you need,” said Dr. Babcock. “No appointment is necessary, you can walk in at any time. Or you can call us and always speak to a real person who can answer your questions.”

In addition to Berry Farms, Physicians Urgent Care has two other locations — 155 Covey Drive, Suite 100 in Franklin; and 700 Old Hickory Blvd, Suite 207 in Brentwood. A fourth location in Nashville West is set to open later this year. Most private insurance is accepted. For more information, visit www.PhysiciansUrgentCare.com.

Back to School Physical Examination

Posted by on August 11, 2017

As the summer comes to a close, it is time for children to visit the doctor. While no kid relishes the thought of a physical exam, it is important to get a recent assessment on your child’s overall health. Depending on your school district, the annual exam may be required before your children begin attending classes or join athletic teams.

Why Schedule a Physical Exam?

The physical exam gives you and your doctor an idea of how your child is developing. In addition, you can discuss nutrition, sleep schedules and any pressing concerns you have about your child’s wellbeing.

Your doctor will talk about any prevalent illnesses in the community, as these can vary from year to year. As a parent, you may ask the doctor to talk to your older children about any issues they may feel more comfortable discussing in private and not with mom or dad.

Why Have an Exam Before School Starts?

A back-to-school doctor’s visit is convenient for many parents as it can be scheduled in addition to other errands to prepare for the fall. But there are also specific reasons to get this done before classes start.

Your school district may require certification of vaccinations for young children. As kids get older they may want to participate in physical education classes and you want to make sure they are physically able to do so.

If your teen is on any school athletic teams, they may require an examination by a school physician before they are cleared to play. Note that this exam typically only looks at whether your child can be on the school team and doesn’t address other health issues.

Taking the time to talk about any unexplained changes, like possible allergies, before school starts allows you to make preparations with the school. No parent wants to discover their child is allergic to nuts during a field trip before they have been able to educate their child and the teachers about steps to take in the case of a reaction.

Premium Medical Care in Tennessee

At Physicians Urgent Care, we make your child’s care our highest priority. To learn more, visit one of our convenient locations in Franklin or Brentwood, Tennessee.

Sports medical myths: Understanding fact from fiction

Posted by on August 10, 2017

Urgent Care Services for Sports Injuries. ER Doctors Available In Brentwood, TN
With the arrival of the fall sports season come concerns about injuries, training and conditioning. And with these concerns comes confusion.

“Unfortunately, there are many medical myths circulating that make it difficult to know fact from fiction,” said Dr. Ty Babcock of Physicians Urgent Care, which has clinics in Williamson county. “This can put the health and safety of athletes at risk.”

Here are a few common myths:

Myth: Stretching prevents injuries
Fact: Recent studies found that stretching before exercise or activity may actually hamper muscle performance. This is especially true for “static” stretching (holding a stretch longer than a few seconds), which instead of preparing muscles for a workout, actually weakens them, increasing the risk of injury. On the other hand, a warmup — which is different than stretching — is beneficial. Warming up, like taking a light jog or easy practice swings, primes the muscles before intense activity. You can also safely add high knee exercises, squats and lunges to a warmup.

Myth: Play through pain
Fact: Playing a sport or exercising should not be painful, especially for young people. If acute pain occurs, it’s likely due to poor technique or even worse, a serious injury that should be checked by a physician. Soreness, stiffness, and some discomfort can be expected, but sharp pain is never normal.

Myth: Weight lifting in preadolescents and adolescents causes growth plate injuries
Fact: Studies have found that growth plate injuries reported from weight training were due to improper technique, inadequate adult supervision or inappropriate weight selection. With proper technique and supervision, weight training for young people can be done safely. “It’s important to use a full range of motion, and you should avoid going too heavy early on,” says Dr. Babcock.

Myth: Being strong will prevent injury
Fact: Any athlete, no matter how strong, can get injured at any time. Building muscle strength is definitely important for lifting, jumping and running. But sports injuries will occur, especially if an athlete is over-exerting, fatigued, or dehydrated. Proper training and conditioning, while allowing appropriate time for muscle recovery in between training sessions, are still the best ways to reduce injuries.

Myth: Use heat to treat acute injuries
Fact: Ice is the best treatment for the first 2-3 days. After an injury, there’s a lot of blood flowing to the injured area, causing the swelling. Ice will help reduce that initial swelling as well as naturally numb the area to help diminish pain. Using heat could actually cause the area to swell more.

Myth: An ankle sprain is worse than an ankle fracture
Fact: An ankle fracture typically takes longer to heal than a sprain and may even require surgery, which can prolong the time away from sports. Even high ankle sprains, which take longer to heal than more common low sprains, heal sooner than most ankle fractures.

Physicians Urgent Care currently has three locations — 155 Covey Drive, Suite 100 in Franklin; 700 Old Hickory Blvd, Suite 207 in Brentwood; and a new clinic in Berry Farms, 5021 Hughes Crossing, Suite 165 in Franklin. A fourth location in Nashville West is planned for later in 2017.

Tips for Staying Healthy Through the School Year

Posted by on August 5, 2015

Back to School Tips Physicians Urgent Care Brentwood, TNYou’re ready for them to go back to school. And you’re getting them ready to start the school year. Marking off the list of “must haves”: pencils, markers, note books, school books, backpack, and new clothes – for getting started. And one last family vacation weekend fling together before everyone is in a new grade.  As you check your list once more, your mind wanders to how to keep your children healthy through the coming school year. Physicians Urgent Care in Brentwood and Franklin Tennessee provide these tips to help you avoid the illnesses that come with kids going back to school.

There are some time-honored practices that serve to protect your youngsters from contacting, and from sharing, air-borne illnesses. Instill these as habits in your kiddos and help them stay healthy through the school year.

  1. “Wash your mittens, you darling kittens.” Does it get simpler? The habit of hand-washing goes the distance in guarding your little ones, and everyone, from germs. Teach your children to wash their hands with warm water and soap each time they use the bathroom, after recess and gym class, if at all possible, and before meal times. These habits will become ingrained, and you’ll have healthier kids.
  1. Teach your children that, while sharing is the right thing to do, they must not share their water bottle, drinking glass, or straw with their buddies.
  1. Make sure the children have breakfast before they leave home to start the school day. If a sit-down breakfast is out of the question, the meal can be on-the-go. A breakfast bar high in protein and drinkable yogurt give your kiddos a power-start to their morning. And include a chewable vitamin.
  1. A lunch box packed with easy, interesting, and healthy items will tempt your kiddos to eat. Finger foods might be best, and making each offering as convenient to eat as possible will go a long way. Include an icepack for safety’s sake.
  1. Get them moving after school. After a day of sitting and stress, kids need exercise to burn off some energy before sitting down to homework. And a quick snack of fruits and veggies before dinner will serve them well when they come home, too.
  1. The habit of a regular bedtime during the school year is important for your children’s health. Lights out, electronics off, eyes closed. Good luck, but give it the best shot. It truly is important.
  1. When your little ones are ill, keep them home. Remember the no-share rule. It goes for illnesses, too. Teach them to cough and sneeze into their elbow (or a Kleenex) rather than into their hands. Have them keep a Kleenex in their pocket for nose-blowing when they have the sniffles. And instruct them to not rub their eyes, that their unwashed “mittens” carry germs that can make them feel really lousy.
  1. Make sure that vaccinations are up-to-date, and keep the records in a secure place. Vision and hearing screenings prior to starting the school year could catch something you’ve missed and give your child the foundation for learning that every child needs – being able to see and hear in the classroom.

When you or a family member is ill or injured, come into your local Physicians Urgent Care in Brentwood or Franklin, Tennessee. You’ll be seen quickly by an ER physician at a fraction of the cost of an ER visit. And no appointment is necessary. Our care givers are ready to treat you well. When you need us, we’re in the neighborhood. Because your children staying healthy through the school year is your goal and ours.

 

‘Tis the Season for the Sniffles

Posted by on November 20, 2014

Upper Respiratory Infection Care in Franklin And Brentwood, TNYou’ve heard it called “the sniffles,” and you’ve most likely had “the sniffles.” It’s most common during the fall months, winter and early spring, and it’s the most common illness resulting in doctor visits and days of missed work and school. But “the sniffles” is an alias. This ailment is most likely a form of upper respiratory infection.

The majority of upper respiratory infections are caused by viruses. Symptoms include having a runny nose, a scratchy, sore throat and a cough. You may experience difficulty in getting a deep breath, and sometimes complications occur, but on the whole, the outlook is good since the symptoms of upper respiratory infections are treatable.

A meaner relative of the upper respiratory infection family is the sinus infection. The most common symptom of this illness is sinus pain.  When the cavities around your nose become inflamed, the swelling and pressure can cause headache and earache. It may feel that your whole face hurts. Add a runny nose and a sore throat into the mix and you’re in for a few days of discomfort.  These symptoms are generally worse in the morning, because of the fluid collection through the night.

Rest is important in combating upper respiratory infections.  Over-the-counter medications will counteract any fever and body aches.  Choose something that calms your cough so you can rest and a decongestant that will allow you to breathe easier.  Drink plenty of fluids to help flush your system and keep you hydrated.

Anytime you’re ill, and especially if you’re unsure of what is causing your illness, you should see a doctor.  If your illness is re-occurring, you may need specific treatment.

When you’re ill, in pain and in a hurry, come into Physicians Urgent Care. Just drive up and walk in – we’re in your neighborhood, and we’re here for you seven days a week. No appointment is necessary, and our ER doctors will see you in a fraction of the time and at a fraction of the cost of an ER visit. When you need medical attention, we’ll provide prompt, qualified, compassionate care, and peace of mind. For directions, hours, and information in Franklin, Tennessee, call 615-472-1550.  In Brentwood, call 615-457-3864.